Using social media to disseminate policy...brilliant

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Update: Responses from the Victoria DoJ can be found here: http://www.privacywonk.net/2011/05/victoria-doj-social-media-video-follow-up.php

The video below was released on March 16, 2011 by the Department of Justice, Victoria, Australia.  It details the departments view on appropriate personal and professional uses of social media.  It's a fantastic four minute video that clearly communicates policy about social media while also demonstrating exactly what the policy's intent is through example  interactions. 

I recently presented at the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) Privacy Summit in March of 2011 on the topic o. implementing the new compliance requirements of OMB M-10-22 (new cookie policy) and OMB M-10-23 (third party websites and applications).  I would have loved to show this video to hammer home the professional v. personal use portion of the presentation.  Budgetary constraints aside, I think this is a fantastic way to disseminate policy.  Imagine asking your employees to watch a four minute video vs. reading a 10 page policy document? Benefits?  Minimal work disruption, increased knowledge of new policies, and higher compliance/adoption of the new policy.






I am going to reach out to the Victoria DoJ and see if they have been tracking statistics after the release of this video...stay tuned.

Update: Responses from the Victoria DoJ can be found here: http://www.privacywonk.net/2011/05/victoria-doj-social-media-video-follow-up.php

2 Comments

Hi Tim,

The thing I like about this video is the light touch they use - totally unexpected from a government organisation. It's one of the best examples I've seen any place of getting the message across. You're right, people will be so much more receptive, and consequently better informed, because the DoJ put some thought into how their audience would want to consume the content.

It's a great example of a corporate social media policy but also an excellent example of effective content marketing.

Cheers,
Sarah

Cool movie! I guess these issues should be advertised wider.